Rearview Cameras

How a small White House agency stalls life-saving regulations

The little-known Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs can delay, rewrite or kill rules mandated by Congress, and as the case of requiring rearview cameras on cars shows, it often uses that power.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – But for a small, little-known White House agency, Melissa Helcher might not have killed Clark Biddle in a Columbus, Ohio, parking lot on a cold February day this year.

A Blind Spot on Rearview Cameras – 10/2/13

October 2, 2013

Safety is a big issue for Americans, but many dangers persist simply for lack of political will to confront them.

Rear View Cameras Need to Be Acted On, Dr. Greg Culbransen, 9-25-13

Greg Gulbransen is a pediatrician in New York.

Five years after my son Cameron died in a car crash, Congress passed a law, named after my boy, to ensure that such a tragedy never happened again. But five more years have passed, and the safety fix that Congress ordered completed by 2011 has been needlessly delayed. I’m suing the Obama administration to compel it to do what Congress directed.

Backup Camera Rule With $2.7 Billion Cost Delayed Again by U.S.

By Angela Greiling Keane – Feb 29, 2012
A U.S. rule that may require all cars and light trucks sold in the country to have rear-view cameras won’t be issued by today’s deadline and may be delayed until after November’s presidential election, regulators said.

A 2008 auto-safety law signed by President George W. Bush mandated the Transportation Department to issue the requirement by the end of 2011. It’s now being pushed back a second time by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and will be issued by Dec. 31, the department said in an e-mailed statement yesterday.

U.S. Delays Rule on Rearview Car Camera

DETROIT — Safety regulators will not complete the details of a rule mandating rearview cameras on all passenger vehicles until the end of the year, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood told Congressional leaders on Tuesday.
 

U.S. Rule Set for Cameras at Cars’ Rear – 2/27/12

On average, two children die and about 50 are injured every week when someone accidentally backs over them in a vehicle, according to KidsAndCars.org, a nonprofit group that pushed the government to begin tracking such tragedies. And more than two-thirds of the time, a parent or other close relative is behind the wheel.

Best backup cameras improve vehicle safety

The U.S. Transportation Department is betting that backup cameras on light cars and trucks will save lives.
Through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the department has proposed that every light duty vehicle sold in the United States by 2014 have some sort device on it that detects pedestrians in the blind spots behind a vehicle.
By pedestrians, NHTSA actually means children under 5 years old and people over 70 years old. Those two groups make up 77 percent of the estimated 228 people killed in back up accidents every year.