Keep Your Eyes On The Road And Don’t Trust Auto Braking Just Yet

“People [were] saying they were turning it off… The technology can help and does save you and prevents crashes, but only if it’s on and only if it’s working,” said Jason Levine of the Center for Auto Safety. “We want to see this move towards a recall very quickly.”

The technology is designed to stop your car even when you don’t, but customers say their car is breaking suddenly without warning, when it doesn’t need to. CBS News found reports of several accidents and injuries that drivers blamed on false activations of emergency automatic braking systems. Safety advocates and carmakers say in the vast majority of cases it works, but it is not perfect.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is now investigating the 2017 and 2018 Rogue after learning of nearly 850 complaints of false activation of the SUV’s automatic braking system. That includes reports of 14 crashes and five injuries.

The Rogue, like about half of new cars sold, is equipped with forward collision avoidance technology that includes automatic emergency braking. It’s supposed to sound an alarm and automatically brake if you are about to rear-end another vehicle. It will be standard in most cars within three years.

“People [were] saying they were turning it off… The technology can help and does save you and prevents crashes, but only if it’s on and only if it’s working,” said Jason Levine of the Center for Auto Safety. “We want to see this move towards a recall very quickly.”

Click here to read and view the full story from WFMY 2 News via CBS This Morning.